Trojan Horse

Trojan Horse

Trojan horse is the name given to a computer virus. It is a type of computer software that disguises itself in the form of regular software such as utilities, games, and sometimes even antivirus programs. The term originated from the ancient Greek story that the deceitful Trojan horse led the city to the fall of Troy. Among the first pieces of malware among the Trojans is the presence. Their names were made entirely in the 1974 U.S. Air Force report, which listed all the hypothetical methods of dealing with computer systems. It will not stay long in the fictional realm.

Trojans are usually spread by some social engineering, for example where a user is tricked into executing a disguised email attachment without being suspicious (for example, having to fill out a routine form), or by clicking on a social media ad or elsewhere. The Trojans do not spread themselves and, as their name suggests, these malicious codes, like the Greeks surprised at the attack on Troy, reach the computer in the guise of a seemingly innocent program, which in many cases releases a second program after execution, the Trojan itself. This is the normal behavior of downloader Trojans. A simple animal-themed speculative game, it creates its own backup on every drive that the current user can access, taking great pains to not damage or overwrite anything in the process. It was harmless and easy to correct, but since it did not reveal the virus in it, it qualified as a Trojan. Also, they do not replicate but can be connected to a virus that can spread to other computers throughout the network. Installing a good, licensed anti-virus software keeps computers’ virus definitions up to date, email attachments may sound authentic, but be careful when opening them, and paying attention to system security popup messages are some of the ways you can keep a computer safe and secure. Trojans can allow an attacker to access a user’s personal information, such as banking information, passwords, or personal identities. It can delete a user’s files or infect other devices connected to the network. The Trojan horse can also be identified as the Trojan Horse Virus but this is technically incorrect. Unlike a computer virus, a Trojan horse is not able to replicate itself, nor can it spread without the help of an end-user.

Unlike computer viruses, worms, and rogue protection software, Trojans usually do not try to inject themselves into other files or otherwise try to propagate themselves.

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