Shunning

Shunning

Shanning can be a work of social rejection or sensitive distance. In the religious context, the omission of a formal decision by a name or congregation to stop interacting with an individual or a group and to follow a certain set of rules. It is separate but may be related to the previous communication. Shanning has a long history as a means of organizational influence and control. The final form and the extreme forms of related practice have made the common practice controversial in some quarters. In social groups where a person’s social identity and well-being are closely linked to regular conversations with members of other groups, empathy for those who violate group rules can be a very emotionally painful and effective punishment.

Social rejection occurs when a person or group deliberately avoids socializing and habitually stays away from a person or group. It can be a formal decision of a group, or a less formal group action that spreads as a form of solidarity among all members of this group. Old Order Amish use, for example, much lesser punishment, including gossip, speeches by church officials, and public confessions for everyday crimes. Shanning is the most severe punishment and is reserved for the most serious crimes such as marrying an unresolved person, committing adultery, having extra contact with the outside world, and getting drunk. Scanning was only established through a unanimous vote of the church community. This approach should influence, encourage, or force emotional behavior from members. It can, on the contrary, prevent some from behaving, or force them to refrain from certain behaviors. Avoiding this context may include stabilizing by other members of the community who are doing well. It is sanctioned against associations, often associated with religious groups and other tightly woven organizations and communities. Rejection targets may include individuals who have been identified as apostates, whistleblowers, disgruntled strikers, or anyone in the group who is considered a threat or a source of conflict. Deviation from an established relationship certainly causes pain, which is at least an unintended consequence of the rituals described here, although in most cases it can also be an intentional, obligatory consequence. This pain, especially when viewed unjustly as a victim, can have secondary general psychological effects on self-worth and self-confidence, trust and credibility, and impair mental function like other types of trauma. Some groups are made up of people who are far from the same idea.

Although excluded practicing societies may impose a life sentence, it is usually limited to a certain period of time, which is often proved by another formal hearing or by the person who returned to a socially responsible manner. The social rejection was in many conventional legal systems and it was a punishment. These national prohibitions include the Ashta Mantra of ancient Athens and the Kasepekang still used in Balinese society.

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