Authoritarianism

Authoritarianism

Authoritarianism, the principle of blind submission to authority, contradicts the freedom of thought and action individually. Authoritarianism is a type of government characterized by strong central power and limited political freedom. Political scientists have created a number of typologies that describe the diversity of authoritarian forms of government. Authoritarian leaders often exercise power without taking into account arbitrary and existing law firms, and their normally elected citizens cannot be replaced by freely elected citizens of various constituencies. Authoritarianism is an idea that originated in the 19th century, literally autocratic rule. Authoritarian governing bodies may be autocratic or dispositional in nature and subject to the rule of any party or military force.

An authoritarian ideal is a specific form of order, beginning with the ideology of restoring the 19th-century romantic culture of the early 19th century (J. D. Place, L. de Bonald, R. de la Tour du Pin), national heroes, advanced political myths. With an emphasis on the role of power, state, and loyalty (Bonald’s idea is the causal nature of the king’s power, the reality of domination). As a result of citizens and society as away no. Identifying validity based on emotional appeal and identifying the government as a necessary evil to fight “easily recognized social problems, such as underdevelopment, and rebellion.” Other prominent theorists of the authoritarian type of government are known: X de Cortes (1809-53), a supporter of the anti-liberal and socialist, religious-neutral model; FU Shawl (1801-61) – Theoretical of the monarchical version of authoritarianism; G. Tricked (1834-96) – An idealist and theorist of Bismarck’s imperial rule. In the current twenty-first century, it has become rare to target countries with this national government. Targeting countries with this national government have become rare in the current 21st century; Turkey is a country where the President has grown a great deal in his power.

At the very least, an autocratic government lacks free and competitive direct elections in the legislature, free and competitive direct or indirect elections for executives or both. Clearly defined, authoritarian states include the lack of civil liberties such as freedom of religion or countries where governments and opponents do not have the option to power at least once after free elections. These powers include appointing judges without the consent of parliament, issuing decree by force of law, and more. From 1946, the share of authoritarian states in the international political system increased until the mid-1970s but declined until 2000. In the systematic analysis, marginalization depends not only on aggregated ratings but also on the argument that a given system with logical tendencies can regularly save itself.

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