Define Molecular Range and Sphere of Influence

Define Molecular Range and Sphere of Influence

Molecular range is the maximum distance up to which a molecule can exert the force of attraction on another molecule. It is of the order of 10-9 m for solids and liquids. So, the utmost detachment up to which the intermolecular force of magnetism is effectual is called the range of molecular attraction.

These molecules attract each other by consistent force. But these forces have only a small range. The Molecular range is the radius around a molecule in a material to which the molecule can exert attraction force on another molecule. This is distance. The molecular range is the utmost distance up to which a molecule can make use of force of magnetism on another molecule.

Sphere of influence is a sphere drawn around a particular molecule as a center and molecular range as a radius. The central molecule exerts a force of attraction on all the molecules lying within the sphere of influence. It is a pretend sphere drawn with a molecule as a center and the range of molecular magnetism as a radius.

A sphere is drawn with a particle as a center and the range of molecular magnetism as the radius is called the sphere of influence of that molecule. It is the area over which a group or association has power, which is divide from whoever is conventionally in control. Sphere of influence is the spherical space/volume around a molecule in a material, inside which the molecule at the middle can exert an attractive force on another molecule.

 

 

 

 

Share This Post