Tyrannicide

Tyrannicide

Tyrannicide is literally the murder of an oppressor, and for the common man, it is usually the killing of an oppressor by a private person. There are two classes of oppressors whose situation is oppressive by occupation and oppressive by oppression. Arbitrariness was often observed in torture, and some classical kingdoms even enacted laws to exempt those who killed the oppressor or oppressor. The Greeks and Romans, and during the Christian era of Salisbury (d. 1180), Jan Petit (d. 1411), and the Protestant theologians Melanthan, Zingli, and Calvin, who were executed by public or private authorities, were considered conspiratorial murderers and admirable period.

Archaeological perpetrators include Hermioneus and Aristogiton of Athens, who plotted to assassinate the oppressive Hippias, son of Pisistratus, in 514 BC. They only managed to kill the oppressive brother Hipparchus before they killed themselves, yet they received posthumous respect from the Athenian people. Many rulers and heads of state were considered as such by their enemies but not by their followers and supporters. For example, when John Wilkes Booth assassinated Abraham Lincoln in 18 Abraham, he wrote about how he considered Lincoln an oppressor and compared himself to Marx Junius Brutus, who stabbed the Roman dictator Julius Caesar in 44 BC. Laws to kill the oppressor in the classical age have complicated this notion: if someone aims at oppression or succeeds in becoming an oppressor, he can be punished and killed. In reality, though the motives of the atrocities were not politically correct. Juan de Mariana (died 1624) was somewhat liberal in his approach to the dictatorial assassination. His view, when the unfortunate and unacceptable expressions used in the first edition of his book de rage at Regis Institute (3 v. Toledo 1599) are snatched away, is that both types of oppressors can be killed not only by the state but also by civilians There is no way to protect from and citizens know that the law will meet with general approval. Khalid Islambouli was one of three members of the Egyptian Islamic Jihad that were sentenced to death in 1971 for the assassination of Anwar Sadat, Egypt’s dictatorial president. Even the two assassins of Hipparchus were killed, after the torture of Hermodius and Aristotle at the scene, and the main conspirators plotting to assassinate Caesar were similarly forced to kill or commit suicide.

The dictator is a popular literary troupe. Many works of fiction deal with the struggle of an individual or a group of individuals to overthrow and kill an unjust oppressor. Initially, conspiracies against the emperor were common in the Roman Empire, but conspirators generally claimed that the republic was restored by removing an oppressor, but in general, they were aimed at replacing the ruler. From this point of view, the arguments for the assassination of the ruling class came to the center of the moral nature of the regime, where the constitutional rule became oppressive and the legitimacy to oppose it. In addition to Julius Caesar, William Shakespeare’s plays have several agreements with the subject, including Hamlet, Macbeth, and Richard III. Italian playwright, poet, and philosopher Vittorio Alfieri devoted most of his work to this issue.

Share This Post