Culture System

Culture System

A cultural system is the interaction of different elements of culture. This is usually achieved through motivation, a process by which an older generation persuades and forces a younger generation to reproduce an established lifestyle; As a result, culture is embedded in a person’s way of life. It was introduced in 1830 by the then Governor-General of the Dutch East Indies, Johannes van den Bosch. Culture refers to the synthesis of knowledge, experience, beliefs, values, attitudes, meanings, hierarchies, religions, concepts of time, roles, spatial relationships, concepts of the universe, and material things and properties acquired by a group of people. Ethnographic fieldwork typically involves the investigator taking on the role of participant-observer: interacting and interacting with people in a natural way and collecting data by continuously monitoring people’s behavior. Anthropology uses special monographs to draw comparisons between different cultures.

According to the system, the villagers should pay land rent to the government separately for one-fifth of paddy for sugar, coffee, and indigo export crops or one-fifth should work on government land for one year (days 66 days) if they have no land. Culture behaves in its broadest sense; It is a person’s taught, frozen experience that is socially transmitted or, in short, behavior through social learning. Cultural evolution theory holds that characteristics have a specific meaning in the context of the evolutionary stage and they explore the relationship between material culture and social institutions and beliefs. The labor expended in cultivation should not exceed the amount required for paddy production on the same land. Any surplus on the revenue of the allotted land which was recovered from the sale of goods was credited to the villagers; the failure of the crop was submitted to the government for any reason other than the fault of the farmer. Culture is the way of life of a group of people – behaviors, beliefs, values ​​, and symbols that they adopt, usually without thinking about them, and they are passed on from one generation to the next through communication and imitation. Critics of this theory argue that the use of evolution as an explanatory metaphor is flawed because it presupposes a certain aspect of development at the underlying top in modern, industrial society. Ecological methods refer differently to the way in which people around the world do not consider the extent of their evolution, but rather to identify the different types of environments in which they live. A cultural system is very different from a social system although sometimes both systems are identified together as a socio-cultural system.

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