Volstead Act

Volstead Act

The Volstead Act, also known as the National Prohibition Act, established the legal basis for the federal government to implement the Eighteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which prohibits the production, sale, or transportation of narcotics liquids between the United States and its territories. Towards the end of the twentieth century, the Temperance Society was prevalent in the United States. The American Temperance Society was founded in 1826 to persuade people to abstain from alcohol. The Anti-Saloon League was formed in 1893 and eventually became a powerful political force in passing national bans on alcoholic beverages. Congress President Woodrow Wilson has passed the Wall Street law over Veto. The Volstead Act provided for the implementation of the 18th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, also known as the Prohibited Amendment.

The Volstead Act (National Prohibition Act), passed on October 26, 1919, provided for the implementation of the recently adopted Eighteenth Amendment, which prohibits the production, sale, or transportation of alcoholic beverages in the United States. The Wall Street Act defines beer, wine, and other types of alcohol as illegal in the United States if the alcohol content of those beverages exceeds one-half percent. The Volstead Act defined what narcotic alcohol was exactly in conjunction with the Eighteenth Amendment; the Volstead Act was established in an era of U.S. prohibition. The mood movement was active in the United States for most of the nineteenth century, and since the 1900s there has been a growing emphasis on legal restrictions rather than personal reform. Fourteen states adopted sanctions in 1914; in 1919 the number rose to twenty-six. By the end of the nineteenth century, these groups had become a powerful political force, campaigning at the state level and calling for the elimination of national alcoholism. In December 1917, “Prohibition of the production, sale, or transportation of narcotic liquids for the purpose of drinking”, the 18th Amendment was passed by Congress and sent to the States for approval. Although overall alcohol consumption was generally thought to have declined, it continued unabated in most parts of the country, especially in larger cities and larger foreign-populated areas. Critics have pointed to the depressing effects of regular violations of the law, and continue to say that the lucrative business of supplying illicit liquor encourages organized crime and encourages corruption in government officials.

The Volstead Act passed nine months later, providing for the enforcement of sanctions, including the creation of a special unit of the Treasury Department. Voters in many communities, including Westerville, publicly adopted the Wall Street Act and the Eighteenth Amendment, while other Ohioans preferred to drink alcohol and actively campaigned against the amendment’s approval. The amendment found strong support, especially in rural areas, where Methodism and other religious groups preached. By 1932, surveys showed that the vast majority of Americans believed that sanctions had failed. The repeal of the ban became a popular campaign theme for Franklin D. Roosevelt, and the 21st Amendment, which was approved shortly after the president took office, eventually overturned the Volstead Act. Their overwhelming electoral victory prompted Congress to repeal the Eighteenth on February 20, 1933, and pass the 22nd Amendment. On March 22, the Volstead Act was amended to allow the sale of 3.2 percent beer and wine. The Volstead Act was repealed after the approval of the 21st Amendment in December.

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