Taiho Code

Taiho Code

The Taiho Code was an administrative restructuring enacted in 703 in Japan at the end of the Asuka period. It symbolizes the progress that has been made in establishing a Chinese state since the sixth century. It was historically one of the Ritsuryō-sei. It was compiled under the direction of Prince Osakabe, Fujiwara no Fuhito, and Auta Na Mahito. The work was started at the request of Emperor Manmur, and like many other developments in the country at the time, it was largely adapted to the official system of the Tang Dynasty in China. The revised version was named the Year Code. The main work of the Year Code was completed in 718. For some elements of the code, however, Chinese logic and ethics were ultimately taken.

It consists of several important component parts. First, it provides a system of family registration used by the public to determine taxes on land and labor services. The establishment of the Taihi Code was one of the first to incorporate Confucianism as a significant element of Japanese policy and government. The code was revised during the Nara period for some Japanese The Tih and practical requirements of the administration. Daij-kan handled all secular and administrative matters. The Jingi-kan or Worship Department was responsible for annual festivals such as the budget and government court ceremonies, as well as the maintenance of the temple, the discipline of the shrine wardens, and the recording and observation of melodies. It arranged for the establishment of administrative organs by the central government; Governed by the governors of the provinces (Kuni) (Kokushi) who were appointed by the central government; Districts (guns, or cowries) administered by the district governor are locally elected from the gentle; And a township of 50 families, controlled by Headman. The Taih code had only two major discounts from the Tang model. First, official position and class status were innately based, as was always the Japanese tradition, not merit, as was the Chinese method. Second, the Japanese reject the Chinese notion of “paradise of the heavens,” stating that the emperor’s power comes from his imperial descent, not from his righteousness or justification as ruler.

It became effective in the first half of the eighth century. However, it became less effective because changes in social and economic conditions weakened the control of the royal court over land and people. This code is said to be based on the Yonghui Code, which was enacted in 651 by the Chinese (Emperor Yonghui).

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