Punishment

Punishment

Punishment is the practice of imposing something unpleasant on a person in response to some unwanted or immoral behavior or disobedience. Punishment can take the form of death, flogging, forced labor, and even amputation and imprisonment and fines. Suspended punishments consist of fines that are imposed only if a crime is repeated within a specified period of time. The rationale is to impose conditions on a child to avoid self-immolation, to impose social loyalty (especially in the context of compulsory education or military discipline), to protect the rules, to protect against future harm (especially those who are protected from violent crime) and to uphold the law. To keep and respect the rule of law under which social groups operate. Punishment can be self-inflicted with self-effacement and grief of the flesh in religious institutions but is often a form of social coercion.

In some pre-modern societies, the punishment was essentially preventive or retaliatory, and lawsuits against it were passed on to the guilty persons (or their families). Authorities can be either group or individual, and punishment can be carried out formally or informally under other types of social arrangements, such as within the family. Negative consequences that are not permitted or conducted without violating the rules will not be considered as punishment as defined here. However, if a judge or jury can assess the punitive damages in a civil case against a party if the conduct of that party was particularly malicious. Punishing a party for the purpose of punitive harm or setting an example for similar wrongdoers. The study and practice of the punishment of crime, especially as it applies to imprisonment, is called fiction, or is often corrected in modern texts; In this context, the process of punishment is literally called “correction process”. Research on punishment often includes similar research on prevention.

Modern theories of punishment date back to the 18th century, when the humanitarian movement in Europe emphasized the dignity of the individual, as well as his rationality and responsibility. Punishment for achieving their social consequences should be exemplary or be able to intimidate those who may be persuaded to imitate the guilty; Reform, or should improve the condition of such convicts; Is calculated to injure the personal or such minimal feelings or to influence the right of the guilty separator to the relationship, or to be able in proportion to the degree of graduation and crime and the circumstances of each case; Repeatable due to the collapse of human justice. Researchers have found a number of reasons for how effective punishment is in different situations. First, if the punishment follows the behavior immediately, the behavior is likely to decrease. In other cases, breaking a rule may be rewarded, and therefore receiving such a reward is not constituted as a punishment. Eventually, the condition (or violation) of breaking the rules must be satisfied in order to be considered a punishment. Punishment should be fair. What is needed to reform the criminal and protect society should never be exceeded; Because what happens outside of this is cruelty and revenge, a symbol of the barbaric era the circumstances under which the criminal has acted should all be considered. Punishment can be an integral part of socialization and punishment for unwanted behavior is often part of a system of teaching or behavioral change that also includes rewards.

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