Compurgation

Compurgation

Compurgation is the judicial proof of innocence usually prescribed in medieval religious courts. Conflict, which is called the betting and swearing-in of the law, was originally a defense used in medieval law. A defendant can establish his innocence or integrity by taking an oath and swearing by the required number of persons, especially twelve, and they believe the defendant’s oath. Confederation was practiced in criminal matters until the sixteenth century and in civil affairs in the 19th century. Due to the existence of something in German law, but derived from the apostle’s statement that “the oath of affirmation is the end of all disputes” (Heb. 6.16), it allows a defendant to clear himself of the accusation by calling for a specific “oath.” Helpers “(Concierges, Comparators, Eid Dahlfer) to take an oath of his own innocence (see Corpus Iuris Canonisi, ed. E. Fredberg (Leipzig 1879-81; ex-Graz 1955) chief patron and C.K.5. The law’s claim was primarily a reference to a character, first relatives and then neighbors (from the same area as the defendant), often 11 or 12 men, and this was a way to give credence to the defendant’s oath at a time when a person’s oath had more credibility than written record. This can be compared to legal betting, which is the provision of bail at the beginning of legal proceedings to reduce unlawful litigation.

The essence of the method of taking the oath. The party responsible for proving the truth had to present several witnesses (usually 12) who swore that he was telling the truth; They themselves did not testify to this fact and may in fact have no personal knowledge of it. Under general law, it was substantially repealed in 1164 by Clarendon’s constitution as a defense against crime. The value of a person’s oath may vary with his dignity; Sometimes it is necessary to meet the charges by collecting the financial standard oath prescribed for the respondent. Since swearing often has religious implications for the sworn in and there is also the possibility of legal prohibitions, individuals may refuse to take the oath for bad reputations. Common law allowed defense in a civil action at various times in countries until its statute was repealed: in England in 1833, and in Queensland before the Queensland Common Practice Act of 1867, which was directly observed Abolition of law betting. One of the reasons for the longevity of the practice is that complications were often considered better evidence than computation in the case of computing.

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