Mushroom and Pedestal Rocks: Erosional Landforms

Mushroom and Pedestal Rocks: Erosional Landforms

Mushroom and Pedestal Rocks: Erosional Landforms

Many rock-outcrops in the deserts easily susceptible to wind deflation and abrasion are worn out quickly leaving some remnants of resistant rocks polished beautifully in the shape of the mushroom with a slender stalk and a broad and rounded pear-shaped cap above.

Pedestal rocks are also called mushroom rocks. These rocks are mainly formed by the wind exploit. In areas where isolated rock peaks are exposed to the surface, these types of rock structures are formed. They are formed as a consequence of wind attrition, and their nature is a result of the dissimilar rate of wind erosion at the bottom and top. So, in thousands of years, a mushroom-shaped formation is formed, which we call Pedestal Rock. Not only due to the wind, are they also formed due to consecutively water in a parallel procedure.

Sometimes, the top surface is broad like a table top and quite often, the remnants stand out like pedestals.

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