Strike and Lockout

Strike and Lockout

Strike and Lockout

Workers have a right to strike, and employers have a right to lock out workers if an argument cannot be determined. Certain procedures and certain limitations apply under certain conditions. Strikes and lockouts are legitimate actions used by parties to advance their bargaining aims. The distinction is the first, crucial step in understanding the nature of the dispute.

“Strike” means cessation of work by a body of persons employed in any establishment acting in combination or a concerted refusal, or refusal, under a common understanding to any number of persons who are or have been so employed to continue to work or to accept employment. A strike is one of the oldest and the most effective weapons of labor in its struggle with capital for securing economic justice. A strike takes place to resolve a dispute between the employees and their employer. The dispute must be about something in the employer’s control, for example, wages, improved working conditions and other disputes of mutual interest.

“Lock-Out” means the closing of a place of employment or part of such place or the Suspension, wholly or partly of work by an employer, or refusal absolute or conditional, by an employer to continue to employ any number of workmen employed by him where such closing, suspension or refusal occurs in connection with an industrial dispute or is intended for the purpose of compelling workmen employed to accept certain terms and conditions of or affecting employment. A lock-out takes place in response to a strike or to force the employees to accept a demand of the employer. The demand must relate to disputes of mutual interest. The demand of the employer can be, for example, to force the employees to accept changes to their terms and conditions of employment.

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