Behaviorism

Behaviorism

Behaviorism is a teaching theory that focuses only on objectively observable behaviors and allows any independent activity of the mind. Behavior theorists call teaching nothing more than acquiring new behaviors based on environmental conditions. It assumes that the behavior is either a pair of specific previous stimuli to the environment or a reflection of the consequences of a person’s history, especially a combination of the individual’s current motivational status and stimulus of control, including the crisis of empowerment and punishment. All behaviors can be explained without the need to consider the internal mental state of consciousness. Although behavioralists generally play an important role in determining behavior, they focus primarily on environmental events.

The dominant learning theory in the first half of the twentieth century was behaviorism. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, behaviorism was dominant, although from then on new theories began to enter the field of general acceptance. Behavioral attitudes emerged in the early 1900s in response to profound psychology and other traditional theoretical forms of psychology, which were often difficult to predict experimentally, but research was obtained in the late nineteenth century, as Edward Thorndike introduced law at the time. , A method involving the use of consequences to strengthen or weaken behavior. As a result, the successful “intellectual revolution” of the nineteen-sixties identified itself as a rebellion against behaviorism even though the calculation of computationalist assumptions was populist and purposeful – Watson’s personal thematic processes were not banned. B.F. Skinner suggested confidential behavior, including knowledge and emotion, as the subject of the same regulatory change as informed behavior until the 1930s, which he basically called behavioralism. While investigating how Watson and Evan Pavlov investigated the reflections of (conditional) neutral stimuli in accountable conditions, Skinner evaluates the history of reinterpretation of discriminatory (precedent) stimuli that reveal behavior; The technique came to be known as operator conditioner.

The enduring philosophical interest in behaviorism raises this systematic challenge to the scientific stimulus of consciousness and, conversely, to the supposed spiritual inherent news or subjectivity of thought. While there may be few advocates left in behaviorism as an encouraging move, the various practices, and trends in psychology and philosophy can still be effectively “behavioral” styled. Also, while psychoanalytic behaviorism and cognitive schools do not agree theoretically, they have complemented each other in cognitive-behavioral therapies, which have demonstrated utility in the treatment of specific pathologies such as general phobias, PTSD, and mood disorders.

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