What is Dementia?

What is Dementia?

Dementia is the overall sound of a set of symptoms caused by a disorder affecting the brain. Other common symptoms include sensory problems, language problems, and loss of motivation. Awareness is not usually affected. These changes are not part of normal aging and are intense enough to have an impact on everyday life, independence, and relationships. Diagnosis of dementia requires a change from a person’s normal mental activity and more than expected due to old age. These diseases have a significant impact on caregivers. Although Alzheimer’s disease is fairly common dementia, there are many other forms, including vascular and mixed dementia.

The most common cause of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease. Between 60% and 80% of people with dementia have Alzheimer’s, but there are 50 other causes of dementia. The most common type of memory loss is Alzheimer’s disease, which causes 50% to 70% of cases. Other common types include vascular dementia (25%), dementia with leukemia (15%), and frontotemporal dementia. There will probably be a marked reduction in communication with dementia, learning, remembering and problem-solving. These changes can occur quickly or very slowly over time. Less common causes include common stress hydrocephalus, Parkinson’s disease, dementia, syphilis, HIV, and Kreutzfeldt-Jacob disease. Multiple types of dementia can occur in the same person. A small proportion of cases run between families. Less common causes include common stress hydrocephalus, Parkinson’s disease, dementia, syphilis, HIV and Kreutzfeldt-Jacob disease. Multiple types of dementia can occur in the same person. A small proportion of cases run between families. Some treatable conditions can produce symptoms such as dementia, for example, vitamin deficiency, thyroid disease, sleep disorders, or mental illness. Diagnosis is usually made based on a history of illness and cognitive testing with blood tests to rule out medical imaging and other possible causes. The mini-mental state test is a commonly used cognitive test. Efforts to prevent this problem include trying to reduce risk factors such as high blood pressure, smoking, diabetes, and obesity. General screening for the disorder is not recommended.

Dementia is one of the leading causes of disability and dependence among older people worldwide. There are many steps that can be taken to improve the quality of life of dementia sufferers and their carers. Cognitive and behavioral interventions may be appropriate. Decreased neurological diseases include Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and multiple sclerosis. These diseases get worse over time. Exercise programs can be helpful in improving daily life activities and possible outcomes. Treatment of behavioral problems with antipsychotics is common but not generally recommended, including limited benefits and increased risk of death due to side effects. It is one of the leading causes of disability and dependence among older people worldwide. It can become irresistible, it is not only for them but also for their carers and family. About 10% of people develop this disorder at some point in their lives. It becomes more common with age. About 3% of people aged 5–4 years have dementia, 19% between the ages of 75 and 84, and about half of the people over the age of 85. The causes of memory loss can vary, depending on the type of brain changes that may occur Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia in older adults. In 2013, dementia killed about 1.7 million people, compared to 0.8 million in 1990. Dementia is becoming more common as more people live longer. For people of a certain age, it is becoming less frequent, at least in the developed world, due to the reduction of risk factors.

 

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