What is Biotechnology?

What is Biotechnology?

Biotechnology is a broad field of biology, involving living systems and organisms to develop or create products, or “any technological application that uses biological systems, organisms or its derivatives to create or modify products or processes for the use of certain technologies” (UN Convention Biological Diversity, Art 2). These include applications in various fields, ranging from agricultural practice to medical treatment. It not only includes applications in the fields involving the organism but also in other cases where information obtained from the biological aspects of an organism can be applied.

Biotechnology is especially important when it comes to the development of minuscule and chemical tools such as the tools used by biotechnology present at the cellular level. We have used microbial biological processes for over 6,000 years to preserve useful food products and dairy products such as bread and cheese. However these national processes are not understood today by biotechnology, a term first widely applied to molecular and cellular technologies that originated in the 1960s and ’70s. With the development of genetic engineering in the 1970s, the study of biotechnology and other related fields such as medical biology, etc. In the late twentieth and early twentieth century, biotechnology expanded to include new and diverse sciences, such as biotechnology, genomics, recombinant gene techniques, applied immunology and the development of pharmaceutical therapy and diagnostic tests. Developed rapidly as there was new potential to change the genetic material (DNA) of the organism. For more than a decade, the industry of biotechnology was dominated by recombinant DNA technology or genetic engineering. The technique involves dividing the gene into useful cells (often a human protein) into producing cells, such as yeast, bacteria or mammalian cells in culture – which then start producing protein in volume.

But re-writing the blueprints of life carries a huge risk. First, they can be used to end them, rather than using the same technology to extend our lives. While researchers can better understand the engineering of the supercharge flu virus and thus the appropriate rationale for combating the flu, the public’s flaws will be equally obvious: the virus can escape, or someone may undergo surgery. Recent advances in biotechnology are helping us prepare and tackle the most challenges in our society. Belatedly biomedical engineering is an overlapping field that often draws and applies biotechnologies (by various definitions), especially in some biomedical or chemical engineering subfields such as tissue engineering, biopharmaceutical engineering, and genetic engineering.

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