Enumerate the physiological importance of Nucleus and Inclusions

Enumerate the physiological importance of Nucleus and Inclusions

Enumerate the physiological importance of Nucleus and Inclusions

Functions of the nucleus: The nucleus is an organelle found in eukaryotic cells. Within its fully-enclosed nuclear membrane, it contains the majority of the cell’s genetic material. This material is organized as DNA molecules, along with a variety of proteins, to form chromosomes. The main function of the nucleus is to govern gene expression and facilitate DNA replication during the cell cycle.

  • Acts as a control center of the cell.
  • Contains a large number of DNA
  • Storage of genetic information.
  • Takes direct in cell division.
  • Nuclear DNA helps in protein synthesis.

Functions of inclusions: Inclusions are hoarded nutrients, secretory products, and pigment granules. Examples of inclusions are glycogen granules in the liver and muscle cells, lipid droplets in fat cells, pigment granules in assured cells of skin and hair, water-containing vacuoles, and crystals of various types.

  • During complete starvation, the body maintains metabolism from stored food materials.
  • Secretory granules synthesize digestive enzymes and other fluids.
  • Pigments granules are concerned with the coloration of different organs.

Inclusions are never enclosed in a unit membrane, and unlike the organelles and cytoskeleton, they are not essential to cell survival.

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