QS Study

Histological Structure of the Tongue

The tongue is an important organ of the body, an organ that allows you to chew, swallow, and talk. It is a muscular organ situated at the floor of the mouth. It is an important organ of the body, an organ that allows you to chew, swallow, and talk. The tongue is divided into right and left halves by a middle fibrous septum.

Tongue consists of skeletal muscles covered with the mucous membrane on both surfaces.

Histological Structure of the Tongue 1

Fig: Histological Structure of the Tongue

(1) Mucosa:

Lining epithelium is non keratinized stratified squamous epithelium. Because the connective tissue of the lamina propria penetrates the space between muscular bundles the mucous membrane is firmly adherent to the underlying muscles. The dorsal surface of the tongue is covered anteriorly by papillae. Posterior one third contains two types of small lymphoid aggregations and the lingual tonsils. The mucosa covering the upper surface of the tongue is thrown into numerous projections called the lingual papillae in the anterior 2/3rd of the tongue.

(2) Muscle:

It contains skeletal muscles which run in different directions. The muscle fibers are grouped in bundles, usually spaded by connective tissue. Serous and mucous glands are present between the muscle bundles. The muscles of the tongue are voluntary and consist of cross-striated muscular fibers.

(3) Taste buds:

The buds are most numerous on the vallate papillae also over the foliate papillae and the posterior one-third of the dorsal surface and sparsely distributed on the fungiform papillae. These buds are lined by stratified squamous epithelium and are flask-like with a wide bottom. A taste pore pierces the short and narrow neck of each taste bud.

Related Study: