QS Study

The cerebral hemisphere is one half of the cerebrum, the part of the brain that controls muscle functions and also controls speech, thinking, emotions, reading, writing, and learning. The right hemisphere controls the muscles on the left side of the body, and the left hemisphere controls the muscles on the right side of the body.

Blood supply of the cerebral Hemisphere:

Arterial supply: The cerebral cortex is supplied by cortical branches of the anterior, middle and posterior cerebral arteries. It runs forward and medically superior to the optic nerve and enters the median longitudinal fissure of the cerebrum. It is joined to the anterior cerebral artery of opposite side by the anterior communicating artery.

(A) In superolateral surface: It is supplied by the middle cerebral artery.

Exception –

  1. A 2 cm wide strip along the superomedial border extending from the frontal pole to the parieto-occipital sulcus by an anterior cerebral artery.
  2. The area belonging to the occipital lobe – by a posterior cerebral artery.
  3. The inferior temporal gyrus-by posterior cerebral artery.

(B) In medial surface: It is supplied by the anterior cerebral artery.

Exception: The area of this surface belonging to the occipital lobe – by a posterior cerebral artery.

(C) In inferior surface:

(i) Orbital surface:

  • Lateral part – by the middle cerebral artery.
  • Medial part – by an anterior cerebral artery.

(ii) Tentorial surface:

  • It is supplied by the posterior cerebral artery.
  • Temporal pole – by a middle cerebral artery.

Cerebral Hemisphere 1

Fig: Arterial supply of Cerebral Hemisphere

Venous drainage:

(A) External cerebral veins –

(1) The superior cerebral veins:

(2) The superficial middle cerebral vein:

  • Drains – The area around the posterior ramus of the lateral sulcus.
  • Terminates – In the cavernous sinus.

(3) The deep middle cerebral vein:

  • Drains – The surface of the insula.
  • Terminates – In the basal vein.

(4) The inferior cerebral vein: It is divided into orbital and temporal veins.

  • Orbital vein – terminates into superior cerebral vein or superior sagittal sinus.
  • Temporal vein – terminates into the cavernous sinus.

(5) Anterior cerebral veins:

  • Drain – The corpus callosum and the anterior part of the medial surface of the hemisphere.
  • Terminate – In the basal vein.

(B) Internal cerebral veins:

It is formed by the union of the thalamostriate and choroidal veins. The right and left veins unite together to form the great cerebral vein.

(C) Terminal veins:

(1) Great cerebral vein: Terminates – In the straight sinus.

(2) Basal vein: Formed by the union of –

  • The anterior cerebral veins,
  • The striate veins,
  • The deep middle cerebral vein.

(3) Terminates – Into the great cerebral vein.

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