Objective of Antitrust Legislation in Government Regulation - QS Study
QS Study

An objective of Antitrust Legislation in Government Regulation

The antitrust legislation is supposed to endorse and defend competition, or, if you will, competitive processes in distinct “lines of commerce” or “relevant markets.” This alone is their proper purpose. These laws have evolved along with the market, vigilantly guarding against would-be monopolies and disruptions to the productive ebb and flow of competition.

The objectives of antitrust legislation arc as stated below-

(a) Economic objective: antitrust was an attempt to cling to the belief in the economic model of perfect competition. These laws have evolved along with the market, vigilantly guarding against would-be monopolies and disruptions to the productive ebb and flow of competition. The antitrust laws are intended to promote market economics and healthy competition in every market while checking the abuses that sometimes arise in different markets.

(b) Political objective: It is stemmed from a reluctant choice to allocate to government more power over business. The protection of small producers against big producers or of consumers against producers is, in fact, a part of a social policy that is underlying the core logic of Antitrust Legislation policy.

 (c) Social objective: Antitrust was a result of continuing belief in the Protestant ethic. It is clear, in addition, that the “social purpose” concept is impossible as antitrust doctrine. It runs into head-on conflict with the per se rules against cartel agreements.